Highlights

•    Indoor air quality in a cafeteria revealed poor ventilation conditions.
•    Concentrations of most pollutants were much higher indoors than outdoors.
•    More than 80% of the particles were generated indoors.
•    PM10 included components of personal care products, plasticisers and psychoactive drugs.
•    Cancer risk associated with inhalation of metals and PAHs was found to be negligible.

 

Credit: Amanda Mills CDC

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