The indoor air science community is familiar with both the research and community hygiene efforts of Max Joseph von Pettenkofer (1818‐1902). Among his many great achievements and contributions to the science, policy, and practice of hygiene,1 Pettenkofer first observed and demonstrated how carbon dioxide could be used as the main indicator of indoor air quality when determining the required ventilation rate in a building. Today, this indicator remains in use as industry standard practice. To honor the pioneering contributions of Pettenkofer to building ventilation, the International Society of Indoor Air Quality and Climate (ISIAQ) established the Pettenkofer Gold Medal in the late 1990s. This medal has been awarded at each of the Indoor Air conferences since 1999, in recognition of an individual’s outstanding work toward advancing the indoor air sciences.2

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